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Pranayama + Anatomy of Breath, with Liam Bowler + Kendra Potter

Pranayama & Anatomy of Breath

https://pranayama-anatomy.eventbrite.com/

A breath is one of your very first, and very last, gestures of this life. Throughout your life, it’s automatic and voluntary both. It’s a steady stream, awake or asleep, susceptible to the ripples and tides of movement, thought and emotion. It’s the cornerstone of many meditative traditions, including a whole branch of yoga called pranayama* Your body also does some really interesting anatomical things every time you inhale, exhale or suspend a breath.

If finding out more about all this sounds right up your alley, we’d love to have you join us for this workshop. We’ll unpack the art and practice of pranayama, and by the end of the day you'll have at least a few easy-to-remember guides for cultivating a home practice, with or without āsana.

We’ll also dive into some of the anatomical terrain of the breath, including: 
- the diaphragm and accessory muscles
- the body as a fluid pressure system, what "breathing into" a body part can mean, and anatomy of the bandhas
- and the profound impacts a pranayama practice can have on the autonomic nervous system.

ABOUT THE SPACE & REGISTRATION

This workshop is limited to 22 students and will likely sell out. $85 covers tution, tea and handout. No refunds, so commit :)

You must pre-register to attend, via the ticket link or by paying Liam or Kendra directly with a check or cash. Thanks!

https://pranayama-anatomy.eventbrite.com/

If the title of this event doesn't say "sold out," there's still space. When it does, we'll start a wait list if need be.

We’ll be cozy out in the beautiful Hummingbird Lodge, just outside Missoula, with tea and blankets and lots of props to facilitate learning, breathing and experiencing well.
Bring your own lunch, a notebook if you’d like, and a water bottle, please and thanks.

Thanks and love, Liam and Kendra

* pranayama translates to either restraint of or liberation of the breath, depending on who’s translating. We think it’s an interesting note, and perhaps the practice is best described as a kind of restraint whose goal is liberation.

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Earlier Event: November 12
The Creatrix: A Grief Ceremony